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The CESE solver is a com­press­ible flow solver based up­on the Con­ser­va­tion El­e­ment/­So­lu­tion El­e­ment (CE/­SE) method orig­i­nal­ly pro­posed by Dr. Chang in  NASA Glenn Re­search Cen­ter.  Some ap­pli­ca­tions of this method in­clude solv­ing many dif­fer­ent types of flow prob­lems, such as det­o­na­tion waves, shock/­acoustic wave in­ter­ac­tion, cav­i­tat­ing flows, and chem­i­cal re­ac­tion flows, flu­id-struc­ture in­ter­ac­tion prob­lems with the em­bed­ded (or im­mersed) bound­ary ap­proach or mov­ing (or fit­ting) mesh ap­proach, airbag de­ploye­ment and so forth.

De­scrip­tion: This prob­lem shows a su­per­son­ic wedge im­pact­ing an in­com­ing shock wave. The shock waves are then re­flect­ed on the walls and keep in­ter­act­ing with each oth­er.

De­scrip­tion: This prob­lem shows a sam­ple mod­el of shock Di­a­monds and Mach disk us­ing the axi-sym­met­ric CESE solver. This video is a cour­tesy of Kazuya Ya­mauchi of LANCE­MORE Cor­po­ra­tion, Japan.

De­scrip­tion: In this prob­lem, the FSI ca­pa­bil­i­ties of the CESE solver are bee­ing used in or­der to study the max­i­mum de­flec­tion of a traf­fic sign un­der high wind con­di­tions.

De­scrip­tion: This prob­lem shows a ex­am­ple of com­press­ible flow ap­pli­ca­tion in the do­main of tur­bo­ma­chin­ery. It shows the FSI in­ter­ac­tions be­tween ro­tat­ing sol­id tur­bine blades and the in­com­ing high speed flow.

De­scrip­tion: This ex­am­ple is to test the in­ter­ac­tion of flu­id/­shell and flu­id/­sol­id vol­ume el­e­ments. A high-pres­sure (two at­mos­pheres) air flows from left to right pass­ing over a sol­id block and a shell struc­ture, push­ing both while mov­ing to the right. The pres­sure ini­tial con­di­tion is one at­mos­phere every­where. A pre­scribed bound­ary con­di­tion is used on the in­let face (left), a sol­id wall bound­ary con­di­tion on the bot­tom right, and all oth­er bound­aries treat­ed as open bound­aries.

De­scrip­tion: This prob­lem is in­tend­ed to test the flu­id/­struc­ture (thin shell) in­ter­ac­tion. High-pres­sure (three at­mos­pheres) air en­ters the bag from the bot­tom hole to open a fold­ed bag. The pres­sure ini­tial con­di­tion is one at­mos­phere every­where. A pre­scribed bound­ary con­di­tion is used on the in­let hole, and all oth­er bound­aries are open bound­aries.

De­scrip­tion: This prob­lem is in­tend­ed to test the flu­id-struc­ture in­ter­ac­tion and mov­ing mesh on pis­ton type ap­pli­ca­tions. A ini­tial­ly loaded spring com­pressed the air in the pis­ton. Pres­sure waves bounce back against the wall and in­ter­act with the spring mak­ing it a com­plete FSI prob­lem. The spring os­cil­la­tions get pro­gres­siv­el­ly damped.

De­scrip­tion: In this ex­am­ple, a sim­u­la­tion of cav­i­tat­ing flows (cav­i­ta­tion area shown in red) in high-pres­sure, high-speed diesel in­jec­tors is done. It can pro­vide valu­able and de­tailed in­for­ma­tion for noz­zle de­sign and spray breakup mod­el­ing. For this prob­lem, one slice of the ax­isym­met­ric noz­zle is cho­sen as the cal­cu­lat­ing do­main and the 2D, 2D ax­is-sym­met­ric or 3D solver can be used.